Archived posts, November 2008

Reading up on WAI-ARIA

WAI-ARIA, the Accessible Rich Internet Applications Suite, helps developers make their web applications more accessible to people who rely on assistive technology. Start reading up on it.

Posted on November 3, 2008 in Accessibility, JavaScript, Web Standards

Character encoding

Character encoding can be very tricky to get right all the way from your keyboard to the end user’s browser, but reading these two articles may increase your chances of getting it right.

Posted on November 4, 2008 in Coding, Web Standards

Going from WCAG 1.0 to WCAG 2.0

It is time to start reading up on WCAG 2.0. It may be a lot to digest, but there are documents available that compare the checkpoints in WCAG 1.0 to WCAG 2.0.

Posted on November 6, 2008 in Accessibility

Find nasty JavaScript with the Obtrusive JavaScript Checker

The Obtrusive JavaScript Checker is a Greasemonkey user script and Firefox extension that will examine the web page you are on and highlight obtrusively implemented JavaScript.

Posted on November 10, 2008 in JavaScript

Writing good alt text

It is quite common to come across images with missing alternative text or alternative text that does not properly describe the image’s content or function.

Posted on November 11, 2008 in (X)HTML, Accessibility

Remember to specify a background colour

There is no guarantee that web browsers always use a white background, so if your design needs a white background, remember to specify it in your CSS.

Posted on November 13, 2008 in Accessibility, Graphic Design, Usability

Dyslexia and accessibility

The problems dyslexics have when using the web are often overlooked, even by people who make an effort to create accessible websites.

Posted on November 17, 2008 in Accessibility

The order of link pseudo-classes matters

The order in which you define the different link states affects the result. My preferred order is :link, :visited, :hover, :focus, :active.

Posted on November 18, 2008 in CSS

Dissecting the Web with Opera’s MAMA

Opera has created a tool called MAMA that analyses the HTML, CSS, and JavaScript used on millions of websites. The presentation of the analysis of the collected data makes for interesting reading.

Posted on November 24, 2008 in Web Standards

TextMate productivity tips

Twelve tips that help you use TextMate more efficiently and remove some of the tedious parts of writing client-side code.

Posted on November 25, 2008 in Coding, Productivity

Make HTML messages readable in Apple Mail

Two tips that make HTML email messages easier to read in Apple Mail. One makes Mail prefer Plain Text by default, the other sets the minimum font size used to display HTML email.

Posted on November 27, 2008 in Accessibility, Apple, Usability